5.18.2016

EDUARDO CHILLIDA'S DRAWINGS & GRAVITACIONES

In 1998, the Museo Nacional Reina Sofía in Madrid in collaboration with the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao celebrated the 75th birthday of Eduardo Chillida with an exhibition in which 200 of Chillida's works went on display, one of the biggest and most important exhibitions dedicated to his life.
The book for this exhibition, originally published in 1998 (and again in 2000), I was lucky enough to find it in the shop of Reina Sofía Museum on our recent trip to Madrid. The book covers a period of more than 50 years of Chillida's work showcasing all of the genres in which he worked -sculptures in various materials and on very different scales and drawings.

EDUARDO CHILLIDA, UNTITLED, 1960, 19x19cm
 
EDUARDO CHILLIDA, UNTITLED, 1964, 15,4x14,6cm
 
EDUARDO CHILLIDA, UNTITLED, 1970, 31,2x24cm
 
EDUARDO CHILLIDA, UNTITLED, 1980, 14,9x21,1cm
 
EDUARDO CHILLIDA, UNTITLED, 1987, 19,9x23,2cm
 
EDUARDO CHILLIDA, UNTITLED, 1987, 38,4x27cm
 
EDUARDO CHILLIDA, UNTITLED, 1987, 40,5x23,2cm
 
Chillida has not only dedicated himself to “giganiticism”, the construction of large-scale public works, he has also created small works; and like no other sculptor of this century, he leaved behind him an immense trail of graphic works and thousands of drawings (not sketches or drafts for sculptures, but drawings in themselves), as well as the “gravitaciones” or reliefs on paper. These works originate new spaces of light and shadow, since the pieces of paper are not set or fixed, as glue “fixes” the collages, but rather gravitate among themselves.

EDUARDO CHILLIDA, GRAVITACIÓN, 1989, 23,2x19,5cm
 
EDUARDO CHILLIDA, GRAVITACIÓN, 1990, 20x25,2cm 
 
EDUARDO CHILLIDA, GRAVITACIÓN, 1993, 28,2x38cm 
 
EDUARDO CHILLIDA, GRAVITACIÓN, 1995, 16,4x23,8cm
 
EDUARDO CHILLIDA, GRAVITACIÓN, 1996, 21x29,5cm
 
Eduardo Chillida (1924-2002) was one of the most influential Basque artists of the 20th century. Born in San Sebastián, he began his career in 1943 studying architecture at the University of Madrid, but in 1947 he turned to drawing and sculpture. In 1948 he moved to Paris where he set up his first studio and began working in plaster and clay. In 1951 he returned to Spain to settle in Hernani in the Basque region where he started working with iron, a material with which he worked for years. In the 50s Chillida began exhibiting his works around the world and became internationally famous. At the end of the decade he used wood for his sculptures and in the 60s -after his travels to Greece, Italy and Provence, France- started working with alabaster. From 1971 onwards, Chillida concentrated his work in large public monuments and converted many tons of steel and concrete into works of art.

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